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Shoppers Only Care About 3 Things

Only three things matter to your shoppers.

It’s easy to think you should add features to your website. After all they ‘might increase conversions’ and ‘couldn’t hurt.’ But, adding unimportant features does hurt. Do you really want someone on your product page distracted by their Facebook friends?

Shoppers only care about three things:

  • Search & Navigation
  • Product
  • Checkout

Ask yourself the following questions and make sure your site meets shopper’s needs.

Search & Navigation

People can’t buy what they can’t find. Search and navigation are your first priority and nothing on your website should prevent it from being simple and effective.

To help shoppers find what they’re looking for, ask yourself these questions:

  • Can I make the categories simpler?
  • Are categories easy to read and easy to click?
  • Does my navigation take shoppers where they expect?
  • Does my search return relevant results?
  • Can I make search faster?

Product

Focus on explaining how your products improve your customer’s lives or solves your shopper’s problems. Be clear on all of the costs associated with buying from you.

Look at your products and ask:

  • Do my product images show what is important to someone using the product?
  • Does the copy explain how my product solves a customer’s problem?
  • Are there real world examples or testimonials?
  • Are the costs, product, shipping and taxes clearly defined?
  • Is your customer service policy easy to understand?

If you’re not solving shoppers real or imagined problems, why should they buy from you?

Checkout:

A shopper’s decision to buy doesn’t happen in any single moment. The decision to buy is the accumulation of a consumer’s experience with your business.

If a shopper believes your product solves their problem and finds the cost agreeable, checkout must be simple and intuitive to keep up a mental momentum until they’ve paid.

Evaluate your checkout process with the following questions:

  • Is checkout clearly explained to the user?
  • Are buttons clearly defined and easy to see?
  • Are form fields well labeled?
  • Can I make each step easier?
  • What can I remove or simplify?

These suggestions take a hard-line. It’s easy to imagine adding features or design elements makes your site better. But before you try adding a new feature, see if you can solve the problem by taking things away or simplifying them.

As the adage says:

‘Perfection isn’t when there’s nothing more to add, but when there’s nothing more to take away.’

Disagree? What else do you think your shoppers care about? Have you tried asking yourself the questions above?

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Posted in Checkout & Payment, Product Management, User Experience | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

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